Queen of Color Diamonds

Where fascination and education about Natural Fancy Colored Diamonds meet

Month: November, 2013

The “Pink Star” Sells for Record $83 Million at Sotheby’s Geneva

Color diamond auctions are always exciting. The gorgeous diamonds, the anticipation, the excitement.  However, when history is made at auction, that is an entirely different story.

In 2010, Laurence Graff purchased a 24.78 carat fancy intense pink diamond that sold for a record $45.75 million which was at the time, a record price for a color diamond at auction.  It was renamed “The Graff Pink

Fast forward to September 2013 when it was announced that the “Pink Star“, a 59.60-carat, internally flawless fancy vivid pink, type IIa diamond would hit the auction block with a pre-estimate of $60 million.  I knew right then and there that this was history in the making.  The Pink Star being double the size of “The Graff Pink” and a higher color grade (vivid) that it would go for a lot higher than $60 million.  Not to brag, but I actually predicted $80 million on our radio show in September.  I figured that even if the pre-estimate was reached it would automatically replace Graff’s record for the highest price ever paid for a color diamond at auction.

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A Sotheby’s employee shows The Pink Star diamond weighing 59.6 carat, during a preview at Sotheby’s, in Geneva, Switzerland. The Pink Star, one of the world’s natural treasures, sold for more than $83 million at auction. (Martial Trezzini,Keystone/Associated Press)

When the diamond sold for $83 million dollars (including buyers premium) by diamond-cutter Isaac Wolfs this past Wednesday evening, it truly was a historic sale making headlines around the world.  “Frankly when I sold the Graff three years ago, I thought it would be a record for a very long time. Tonight’s price is really quite extraordinary three years later,” Sotheby’s auctioneer David Bennett said

The Pink Star.  A 59.60-carat, internally flawless fancy vivid pink, type IIa diamond.

The Pink Star. A 59.60-carat, internally flawless fancy vivid pink, type IIa diamond

More About the Pink Star diamond: 

Originating from a 132.50-carat rough diamond recovered by De Beers in 1999 it was cut and polished by Steinmetz Diamonds.  It took just over two years to cut and polish and was first unveiled as the Steinmetz Pink in Monaco in 2003 and then it was sold and renamed in 2007.

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Yellow Pendants I’m Designing

One of the best parts of my job is that I get to use my creative side with the color diamonds that we sell.

After receiving some half carat intense VS yellow diamonds in a package of diamonds we purchased, I took one look at them and immediately got the inspiration to design some flowers with the yellow stones in the middle. Not only does this highlight the diamonds well, but the designs are very pretty, modern and create a lot of weight because the diamonds are so small.

Once I had my vision it was time to meet with our designer.  He was able to translate my vision into the actual product and provided CAD drawings for me to review.

Here are the samples.

043Pendant+Top_resized053Pendant+3D_resizedI am so thrilled with the design and can’t wait to see them complete, with the chains and stippling effect.

Calling all Junior Gemologists!

GIA has a wonderful program for grades 4-12 whereby kids can become a Junior Gemologist.

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According to GIA “this entertaining workshop lets kids use loupes, microscopes, and other tools of the trade to play gemologist.”

Once completed students become eligible for the Junior Gemologist Scholarship for future GIA adult classes.

I am so excited about to tell my daughter about this. Though she has two years to go, something tells me I should book the trip to LA!

To learn more visit http://www.gia.edu/gem-education-kids

The Largest Vivid Orange Known to Exist Sells for $36 Million

It is always exciting when a natural fancy color diamond sells at auction, but it’s fascinating when it is the only diamond of it’s kind making history and news around the world.

"The Orange," the largest fancy vivid orange diamond in the world. The VS1 clarity pear-shaped diamond of 14.82 carats was estimated at $17 million to $20 million in a Geneva auction. It sold for 32.6 million Swiss francs, or about $36 million, a record for an orange diamond. Source: 2013 Christie's Images Ltd. via Bloomberg

“The Orange,” the largest fancy vivid orange diamond in the world. Source: 2013 Christie’s Images Ltd. via Bloomberg

On Tuesday evening Christie’s Geneva sold a magnificent 14.82 carat pear-shaped vivid orange VS1 diamond for $36 million dollars ($32.6 million Swiss francs).

What makes this sale so extraordinary is that this diamond is the largest fancy-vivid diamond in existence.  Selling at $2.4 million per carat set a record for an orange diamond of its type according to the auction house.

Orange diamonds are exceptionally rare, so it is little wonder that the diamond sold for almost double its pre-sale estimate which was between $17 – $20 million. 

Oklahoma teen finds jellybean-sized yellow canary diamond

I came across this great article from of the New York Daily News from October 22 2013 that I wanted to share.

Tana Clymer, 14, was visiting Crater of Diamonds State Park in Murfreesboro,  Ark., on Saturday when she found the glittering rock. Its appraisal value wasn’t  immediately known, but could be worth around $50,000 to $60,000.

Diamonds are a girl’s best friend — especially if you’re a sharp-eyed 14-year-old.

Oklahoma teen Tana Clymer made a stunning discovery Saturday when she came across a 3.85-carat canary diamond while touring Arkansas’ Crater of Diamonds State Park.

The 3.85-carat canary diamond discovered by Tana Clymer, 14, of Oklahoma City, on Saturday.

The 3.85-carat canary diamond discovered by Tana Clymer, 14, of Oklahoma City, on Saturday.

The park lives up to its name and is home to more than 75,000 of the sought-after sparklers.

Clymer was with her family and didn’t think much of the rock — with its distinct yellow color — when she spied it in the dirt.

“I thought it was a piece of paper or foil from a candy wrapper,” she told park officials. “Then, when I touched it, I thought it was a marble.”

The Oklahoma City girl said she credits God for helping her find the diamond, which followed about two hours of sifting and searching through the park’s volcanic soil.

Tana Clymer, 14, of Oklahoma City, shows off the 3.85-carat canary diamond she discovered Saturday. The yellow diamond is teardrop-shaped and about the size of a jellybean.

Tana Clymer, 14, of Oklahoma City, shows off the 3.85-carat canary diamond she discovered Saturday. The yellow diamond is teardrop-shaped and about the size of a jellybean.

“I was about to sprint to join my family, and God told me to slow down and look,” Clymer added. “Then, I found the diamond!”

The value of the jellybean-sized bling isn’t clear, although the family has stored the prized piece in a safety deposit box.

Park officials say it could be worth tens of thousands of dollars if it’s legit.

The sparkly souvenir that Clymer found is similar to a 4.21-carat rock discovered in 2006. That one was appraised for about $50,000 to $60,000, said Bill Henderson, assistant park superintendent.

“It appears to be of the same quality,” Henderson told the Daily News on Tuesday. “This particular yellow canary will knock your eyes out. The color is so brilliant.”

Tana Clymer’s teardrop-shaped yellow diamond was discovered Saturday. Initially, the 14-year-old thought it was a marble.

Tana Clymer’s teardrop-shaped yellow diamond was discovered Saturday. Initially, the 14-year-old thought it was a marble.

He added that Clymer had tears in her eyes when they told her the diamond’s potential value. She said she may turn the diamond into a ring or use it to help pay for college.

Nearly 400 diamonds have been dug up at the 37-acre Arkansas state park this year.

The last high-profile find was in July, when a 12-year-old North Carolina boy plucked a 5.16-carat rock he nicknamed “God’s Glory Diamond.”

Henderson said the “finders, keepers” policy at the park is a big draw for visitors.

“Everyone’s hoping to hit pay dirt,” he added.

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To view the original article view hereErik Ortiz has given permission for this article to be posted on this blog.

If you would like to use this article, please get permission from the author.  http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/oklahoma-teen-finds-yellow-canary-diamond-dirt-article-1.1492936